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Here Is Why Speech Recognition Is the Future of Customer Service

As companies seek new ways to improve customer experience, it looks like speech recognition and customer service work great in tandem. While many voice technology solutions are still being explored, some of them have already made their way into call centers all over the world.

 

Speech Recognition: the What & the How

 

On the whole, speech recognition is the technology that allows a program to identify and “decipher” human speech.

 

The key difference from simply recording audio is that by processing your voice the computer “understands” what you’re saying. This is usually referred to as natural language processing (NLP). Complex algorithms process the audio, breaking it apart into words and phrases. They assess the context of every response and even the speaker’s emotions.

 

The data retrieved by processing speech can be used for many purposes.

 

Most commonly, speech is transcribed. Speech-to-text conversion allows for manual transcription. This is how you get voice typing (dictation), YouTube’s automatically generated subtitles, and audio translation.

 

Using voice commands to control software is the next logical step.

 

This is where customer service comes in.

 

Voicebots and You

 

Speech recognition in customer service as of 2022 works through “voicebots”.

 

Widely used by call centers, a voicebot is a piece of software that allows the customer to communicate with an interactive voice response (IVR) system.

 

You can still find older IVRs that don’t use voice recognition. Instead you are prompted to press 1, 2, or 3 to pick an option from the menu. On the other hand, the new conversational IVRs don’t require you to touch the phone at all.

 

A conversational IVR processes natural language and uses it as input. Based on whether the caller’s audio contains certain cues, the IVR can respond by providing information, asking questions, or performing actions.

 

Examples:

  • Contacting ISP to report internet connection issues. Before you get through to the human operator, IVR is going to ask you what happened. Then it’s going to suggest you first try to switch your router on and off or check the integrity of the cable.
  • Automating sales calls, phone surveys. As a business owner, you can utilize a voicebot to have it call a list of numbers and offer the product to those interested, addressing their questions and helping them complete the purchase.

As you can see, a voicebot can help your call center operators deal with the deluge of calls by filtering out simple requests that can be handled automatically. This enhances the customer experience by miles: the caller doesn’t have to form the queue waiting for an available operator to finally pick up the phone.

 

All in all, voicebots offer many perks, especially if you’re working to optimize and improve your customer service.

 

  • instant communication; voice recognition makes it easier for customer and business to connect right away, no time and effort wasted
  • reduced costs; with a good voicebot, call centers can hire fewer operators-or scale up
  • out-of-the-box, easily integrated solutions
  • automated troubleshooting; changing user info, providing information, and so on can be done without engaging company employees

As voice technology continues to improve and evolve, we can expect voicebots to grow more sophisticated. If things keep progressing at the current rate, soon voicebots are going to become indistinguishable from human custom service workers.

 

If you want to know more about voice technology, visit our homepage at senstone.io.

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New Trend: Voice Recognition in Education

Using voice recognition in education, especially advanced learning, is a relatively recent development. Voice technology has progressed incredibly fast during the last few years, and what used to be cutting-edge experimental software is now commonplace.

 

Pretty much everyone these days uses a smartphone capable of speech processing. You can not only look up things on the internet using voice input but also communicate with the AI such as Google Assistant.

 

With voice recognition algorithms getting better and more libraries appearing on the market, educational apps are starting to dip their toes into the sea of opportunities that is voice tech.

 

Make Education More Accessible

 

Voice recognition in education gets a lot of attention lately, and for a good reason. For some people, it can be a neat way to take notes. For others, it opens the classroom door.

 

People with certain disabilities (dyslexia in one example) often find it difficult to take notes or do homework, because it involves typing and/or writing. This is where speech-to-text enters the stage. Transcription makes previously difficult tasks come naturally and boosts academic performance.

 

A beneficial side effect is that seeing the words appear on the screen during dictation can help students with reading and writing deficits to better grasp the relationship between letter and sound.

 

As for the students with conditions that affect mobility, voice recognition can be the only means of writing/typing available to them.

 

For deaf students, voice recognition is used to visualise speech using speech-to-text conversion. Again, this can be their only option.

 

Always Learning

 

Education welcomes individual approach, and voice recognition makes it easy in many areas.

 

So far the most popular application of speech processing is foreign language learning, especially learning pronunciation.

 

The student is prompted to repeat after a recording. If the pronunciation doesn’t match, the computer gives feedback and prompts the student again. Basically, this is the (dramatically) improved language lab – the lab that can fit in your pocket.

 

Apps like Rosetta Stone, ELSA Speak, and many others are very good at teaching pronunciation by using speech recognition to identify mistakes. This opens horizons to the people who cannot afford language courses, feel like they need more than lessons can offer – or prefer their learning bite-sized.

 

Implementing Voice Recognition in Education

 

With voice technology showing good results in a classroom setting, implementation is the next logical step.

 

Luckily, voice processing doesn’t require specialised equipment. A regular computer is all you need. Software, on the other hand, needs to be installed, and most of it is heavily licensed.

 

At this stage, awareness is the real challenge. Free licences for schools and universities, special learning programs, and voice technology options for disabled students would become far more accessible if teachers and learners knew about and asked for them.

 

Raising awareness about voice technology in education is an important task. As a company developing speech-to-text note-taking solutions, we hope more people experience the advantages voice technology can offer. To learn more about us, visit the Senstone homepage.

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The (Bright) Future of Wearable Recording Devices

Pretty much everyone will tell you that wearables have great potential, and wearable recording devices are a huge part of this perception shift. Chips are getting more powerful, but they are getting smaller too. Algorithms are being improved constantly. You can process more with less. Yesterday’s impossible is tomorrow’s basic feature.

 

Wearables Can Record Anything

 

When people talk about a wearable recording device, you can be 99% sure they mean a sound recorder. A fancy lapel microphone, if you will. Right now this is what most customers are aware of and what they expect, because until recently there was not much else on the market.

 

However, something remarkable is happening as you read this.

 

We have reached the point where you can record more than just sound. You can record things you experience as what they really are.

 

Not audio but human speech. Not video but objects in the 3D world. Not vibration but haptic feedback.

 

The line between recording and processing is getting blurred. Even the (seemingly) little things like noise cancellation or speech-to-text attest to this: we can record high-quality, customisable, personalised, interactive footage, be it sound, video, or body metrics.

 

In 2022 you can create a 3D model using a low-end smartphone. In a few years, you are going to be able to do the same using a tiny wearable.

 

As for speech, wearable voice assistants are available right now, and they keep pushing the limits of what tech experts thought possible.

 

The Dream of the Skeleton Key

 

With gadgets, improvement often equals adding new features, and wearable recording devices are no exception.

 

If you look back at the tech market of the 2000s, the same thing happened to mobile phones. As the technology progressed, developers kept building around the concept of a personal communicator. This is why you can use your phone to control the smart appliances and not vice versa.

 

The concept of the digital skeleton key has always been in the air. One device to rule them all.

 

Alexa is trying to achieve this. Your phone is participating in the race just as eagerly. Wearables are the new player here.

 

What is interesting about wearable technology in this context is that it often serves to create systems. Your average wearable connects to the phone, sometimes other wearables. Its processing power is contained within the phone or in the cloud. You control it manually via buttons or apps.

 

It is entirely possible that wearables are going to take the internet of things to a whole new level.

 

With sensors growing more sophisticated and voice commands getting better, your smartphone (aka the ultimate remote) might become obsolete in just a decade or three. The device that is going to replace it? There doesn’t have to be one.

  • speech, sleep patterns, heartbeat, movement: all of this and more can be recorded by wearables
  • the recorded information is processed by AI
  • data is synchronised between multiple devices
  • you can directly communicate with the computer

From where we stand as customers and developers, this is where things are headed for wearable technology. User-centred approach, connectivity, and flexibility are the main trends.

 

If you’d like to know more about wearables from the people who create them, visit our homepage. This article was brought to you by Senstone: your productivity is our mission.

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Wearables: Examples of Wearable Technology

Wearables are everywhere these days, and examples of wearable technology available to the customer range from digital wrist watches to ‘smart’ jewellery and fashion accessories. This trend is well past what we would call a fad; there is no longer a doubt wearables are here to stay.

 

In the Palm of Your Hand

 

Wearable technology had few examples until recently and used to be little more than a concept – simply because computers used to be pretty unwieldy up until a couple of decades ago.

 

Before the 1950s, all computers were operating using vacuum tubes. A vacuum tube in ENIAC, one of the most advanced computing machines of the time, was 6.9 centimetres (2 ¾”) tall; there were thousands of them! ENIAC took up a large room.

 

In the 1950s vacuum tubes were replaced by transistors, and these were replaced by the integrated circuits as soon as 1960. An integrated circuit is tiny, nanometres in size, and contains a huge number of transistors. This number is growing with each new generation of electronic chips. We have gone from 1,000 transistors in the 1970 Intel 4004 microchip to 50,000,000,000 in Apple A13 (iPhone 11 Pro) in 2020.

 

“Moore’s Law: the number of transistors on a microchip doubles every two years.”

 

Just like the smartphone that fits in your pocket performs better than the best laptop of 2006, your smartwatch could easily outperform Ferranti Mark 1.

 

The further technology evolves, the smaller powerful gadgets get, to the point where they eventually become wearables.

 

Magic Rings, Superhero Costumes, and Artificial Intelligence

 

As of 2022, examples of wearable technology include everything from lockets that can verify your identity to rings that keep track of your heartbeat. Here are the five products to illustrate just how useful wearables can be.

 

  1. Senstone Scripter

 

This wearable device can record speech and automatically transcribe voice into text, using artificial intelligence to make sense of your notes. You can use it to keep track of things at work and/or at home. The accuracy of speech-to-text conversion is at 99%, and the battery lasts between one and two weeks depending on usage. Senstone Scripter supports 12 languages. It’s small and versatile, which is perfect for day-to-day tasks.

 

  1. Prevention Circul+

 

Prevention Circul+ is a smart ring designed to help you monitor your health. Blood oxygen, heartbeat, sleep, temperature, calories, steps – all of these are tracked by a single accessory. You can access the detailed metrics via the app on your smartphone at any time. Another pro to this wearable: it’s cheaper than other wellness rings.

 

  1. TESLASUIT

 

Unlike most, TESLASUIT is a full-body wearable, a suit combined with VR goggles. Sending electrical impulses to your body, the suit can make you feel touch, impact, and a range of temperatures. It can be used to train professionals in various fields, diagnose and treat patients, or play video games.

 

  1. Fitbit Versa 3

 

Fitbit has gone mainstream, and the Versa 3 watch delivers what we expect from Fitbit – and more. It tracks your sleep pattern, breathing, pulse, blood pressure, counts your steps, and displays time. While smart rings like Prevention Circul+ focus on the health aspect of your well-being, Fitbit is all about fitness. (Although if you crave a next-gen tech experience, you might want to wait for a couple of months for Versa 4.)

 

  1. HIS Wireless Wearable Finger Mouse

 

HIS does exactly what it says on the tin: a wireless controller you can wear on your finger. Its uses are not limited to computers, however, and you can have it act as a pointer or remote controller. You don’t even have to move your wrist, just the index finger.



The showcase above is no way conclusive, and if you look closely, you can find examples of wearable technology pretty much everywhere.

 

  • health and well-being
  • fitness
  • sports
  • technology and office work
  • entertainment
  • business
  • content creation

Every year more and more people use wearables daily. The chips are getting smaller. The materials get cheaper – and more reliable.


Your productivity is our mission. If you want to know more about how Senstone approaches wearable technology, visit the homepage.

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25 Best Productivity Quotes for Work and Life

In case you’d like get motivated, we have hand-picked 25 productivity quotes from people who achieved success in their field. We believe just a few words at the right time can go a long way when it comes to productivity and inspiration.

 

So here it is: 25 quotes by the people who changed the world, each and every one revealing the secret to their productivity.

 

  1. Out of clutter, find simplicity.

Albert Einstein, physicist

 

  1. Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write, which was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table, close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother’s shoulder, and said, ‘Bird by bird, buddy. Just take it bird by bird.

Anne Lamont, writer and productivity expert

 

  1. Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell ’em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.

Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States

 

  1. The most important thing about art is to work. Nothing else matters except sitting down every day and trying.

Steven Pressfield, author

 

  1. Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.

Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor Company

 

  1. The key is not to prioritize what’s on your schedule, but to schedule your priorities.

Stephen Covey, educator and entrepreneur

 

  1. Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.

Aristotle, philosopher

 

  1. Do the hard jobs first. The easy jobs will take care of themselves.

Dale Carnegie, writer and lecturer

 

  1. It’s not always that we need to do more but rather that we need to focus on less.

Nathan W. Morris, productivity and business coach, author

 

  1. Every day that I procrastinate, every day that I sit stagnant in fear, every day that I fail to better myself, someone else out there with the same goals and dreams as me is doing the exact opposite.

Noel DeJesus, author and combat veteran

 

  1. No work is insignificant.

Martin Luther King Jr., civil rights activist

 

  1. You don’t actually do a project; you can only do action steps related to it. When enough of the right action steps have been taken, some situation will have been created that matches your initial picture of the outcome closely enough that you can call it “done”.

David Allen, prolific author and productivity consult

 

  1. What looks like multitasking is really switching back and forth between multiple tasks, which reduces productivity and increases mistakes by up to 50%.

Susan Cain, writer and lecturer

 

  1. Gardens are not made by singing ‘Oh, how beautiful!’ and sitting in the shade.

Rudyard Kipling, author

 

  1. Instead of worrying about what you cannot control, shift your energy to what you can create.

Roy T. Bennett, author

 

  1. Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.

Jim Ryun, athlete and politician

 

  1. Every champion was once a contender that didn’t give up.

Gabby Douglas, Olympic champion in gymnastics

 

  1. If you’re alive, you’re a creative person.

Elizabeth Gilbert, journalist

 

  1. The successful warrior is the average man, with laser-like focus.

Bruce Lee, actor and martial artist

 

  1. Let me tell you the secret that has led me to my goals: my strength lies solely in my tenacity.

Louis Pasteur, chemist and microbiologist

 

  1. The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.

Barack Obama, the 44th president of the United States

 

  1. Nothing will work unless you do.

Maya Angelou, author and activist

 

  1. If you’re going through hell, keep going.

Winston Churchill, politician and writer

 

  1. The simple act of paying positive attention to people has a great deal to do with productivity.

Tom Peters, business management expert

 

  1. The big secret in life is that there is no secret. Whatever your goal, you can get there if you’re willing to work.

Oprah Winfrey, talk show host and producer

 

As you can see, focus and effort are essential for productivity. We hope these quotes have given you the motivation to create something amazing.

 

This page was brought to you by Senstone. To learn more about productivity in the age of distractions, check out our homepage.

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Break the Dopamine Cycle With Scripter

Senstone scripter voice assistant

Scripter is a wearable voice recorder, and dopamine is a neural transmitter. The two are related in more ways than you think.

 

How to trick your brain using Scripter? And how does it work?

 

What is the dopamine cycle, and why does it need breaking? Why do so many people these days talk about it? Read on and find out.

 

Senstone Scripter

 

Dopamine is an organic chemical released by the neurons in our brain. Being a neurotransmitter, it transmits all kinds of signals. In popular culture, dopamine is sometimes known as the “pleasure hormone”, but it’s a very simplistic view.

 

It would be much more fitting to call dopamine the motivation chemical. 

 

Dopamine is released into your system when you anticipate an enjoyable event.

 

The event does not have to be anything major. Pressing a button to see a video game character shoot a blaster at aliens is just as good as witnessing your favorite team win the championship. In fact, it’s more pleasurable due to the simple reality of it being quick and easy to achieve.

 

This is where it gets dangerous.

 

The addiction nobody wants to talk about

 

Dopamine cycle is a pleasure-withdrawal loop you can develop by having too much of a good thing. Momentary pleasure increases your dopamine, which then drops, and you start craving the same activity that had caused the release of the chemical. This way, your brain encourages you to stick to the tasks you find satisfying.

And so you do it again.

And again.

One more time.

Just a bit more.

 

If this sounds like an addiction to you, then you are correct. A perfectly normal neurotransmitter can go haywire and make you associate certain things with pleasure – if you let it.

The most common “addiction” caused by the dopamine cycle?

Data.

Notifications.

Updates.

 

The intense pull to chase instant gratification brought to you by yet another view, yet another repost, yet another animation played in front of your eyes.

 

The habit is stupidly simple to reinforce, so it’s no wonder the internet is the top procrastination spot and entertainment source for most people in 2021. 

 

The good news is that experiencing the information-fueled dopamine cycle does not mean you should toss your phone out of the window and go live under a rock. The cycle can be broken, provided you create the distraction-free environment to “detox” from the stream of feel-good stimuli.

 

This is where Scripter makes its entrance.

 

A wearable recorder with no screen to speak of and a single button, Scripter can help you with the successful dopamine detox in several ways.

 

  • With Scripter, there can be no distractions. The device is physically incapable of displaying images or receiving notifications – and this is a good thing. You can hide your phone; out of sight, out of mind.
  • Stay productive while off the grid. If you find digital detox impossible due to there being just too many things you have to be working on, Scripter is your cheat code to the whole system. Now you can work without typing or even looking at the screen.
  • Long recording sessions. This feature helps you focus without jumping from memo to memo. If the focus is there, you can record a ridiculous amount of text in one sitting (source: experience).
  • Trick your brain. By making Scripter easy to use, we have also managed to make it more appealing to the dopamine-starved brain than scrolling away on your phone. We have turned the instant gratification principle on its head – and it worked!

 

As a productivity and mindfulness tool, Scripter is designed to help you reinforce only the good habits. 

  • Efficiency
  • Focus
  • Dedication
  • Flexibility
  • Creativity

 

Scripter encourages you to take notes anytime, anywhere. Create short memos and to-do lists – or record whole chapters of your newest book. Use it as a digital diary to preserve your happiest memories – or log your business meetings whenever you like.

 

If you want to learn more about Scripter, visit its page on our website. You can also go read more blogs like this one, or check out our Facebook page. If you have any further questions regarding products by Senstone, please do not hesitate to drop us a line at team@senstone.io.

Stay safe!

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Voice Input To Replace Keyboard?

Voice replace typing

The speech to text software has been changing the way we record information. Slowly, but surely, more and more people get used to the idea that the keyboard is not the be-all and end-all of typing.

 

But isn’t the whole voice input business just another a fad? And if it does stick around, should we expect the epic battle of two input methods?

  Voice Input To Replace Keyboard

Every 1 in 4 adults in the United States uses voice to communicate with the machine. Siri, Alexa, and Google Assistant have become so common, nobody bats an eye when you ask the room to pull up some music. And if we take a look at the stats, it’s green across the board, with steady growth for voice tech and consumer awareness on the rise. All in less than 20 years! Surely this means the good ol’ keyboard is about to go the way of the dodo.

  Speech To Text To Replace Keyboard

To see the truth behind things, sometimes you have to think small. One person. One friend group. One family. One business. Numbers point you in the right direction, but with little context they can be misleading.

 

Speech To Text Is the Next Big Thing

While we are starting to entrust more and more to voice tech, it seems like the average user sees a very specific set of tasks where it’s useful on the daily – and where it surpasses the keyboard.

 

  • Note-taking
  • Hands-free calls
  • Internet search
  • Small purchases (take-out, groceries, books)
  • Requesting information and media (weather forecast, music)

 

If we think even smaller, reading comments and product reviews, the reality seems to be that speech to text and keyboard complement each other – at least for now. Of course, sometimes voice gadgets get ahead of the ‘traditional’ input methods. Case in point: Scripter, a wearable developed as a more powerful version of Senstone productivity voice assistant (you might have heard about it a couple of years ago when it took Kickstarter by storm; looks like the devs are going to take the crowdfunding approach again, this time with Scripter).

 

Another point in favor of voice is that it’s bringing technology to places where it used to be impossible or dangerous, such as taking notes while driving – which has become perfectly safe, because in 2021 the driver doesn’t have to look away from the road to jot down a memo.

 

A couple of months ago, one of our friends asked the innovation-savvy crowd over at Quora,

 

“What technology will eventually replace the keyboard?

The answers we received illustrate our point pretty well. While the majority agrees voice interface will move the keyboard from its current pedestal, diversity and flexibility is in high demand. The more options for different tasks, the better.

 

“Voice recognition and dictation will primarily replace the keyboard, but editing and various shortcuts will still need a keyboard, either actual mechanical keys or software or projected and sensed, will still be needed. – Bradley Dichter

 

“It’s hopefully never going to be a total replacement – but in the kitchen you can be elbow deep in gunge and still set a timer and turn the radio volume down. – Andy White

 

“Voice isn’t out of place on mobile devices, but I don’t think we’ll see anything replacing keyboards on computers. – Stan Hanks

 

“With gadgets like personal assistants – Alexa, Siri, etc. all in the works and getting better and better every day, you would think that there would be no need for a keyboard anymore. Everything will be voice. That is good. – Julian Pereira

 

How do you see voice technology replacing the keyboard in your life? If you were given a perfect voice recognition software, would you stop using the keyboard on your phone? The questions that used to belong in science fiction are becoming relevant.

 

For more articles about voice technology, speech to text, and getting things done, visit our blog.