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25 Best Productivity Quotes for Work and Life

In case you’d like get motivated, we have hand-picked 25 productivity quotes from people who achieved success in their field. We believe just a few words at the right time can go a long way when it comes to productivity and inspiration.

 

So here it is: 25 quotes by the people who changed the world, each and every one revealing the secret to their productivity.

 

  1. Out of clutter, find simplicity.

Albert Einstein, physicist

 

  1. Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write, which was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table, close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother’s shoulder, and said, ‘Bird by bird, buddy. Just take it bird by bird.

Anne Lamont, writer and productivity expert

 

  1. Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell ’em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.

Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States

 

  1. The most important thing about art is to work. Nothing else matters except sitting down every day and trying.

Steven Pressfield, author

 

  1. Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.

Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor Company

 

  1. The key is not to prioritize what’s on your schedule, but to schedule your priorities.

Stephen Covey, educator and entrepreneur

 

  1. Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.

Aristotle, philosopher

 

  1. Do the hard jobs first. The easy jobs will take care of themselves.

Dale Carnegie, writer and lecturer

 

  1. It’s not always that we need to do more but rather that we need to focus on less.

Nathan W. Morris, productivity and business coach, author

 

  1. Every day that I procrastinate, every day that I sit stagnant in fear, every day that I fail to better myself, someone else out there with the same goals and dreams as me is doing the exact opposite.

Noel DeJesus, author and combat veteran

 

  1. No work is insignificant.

Martin Luther King Jr., civil rights activist

 

  1. You don’t actually do a project; you can only do action steps related to it. When enough of the right action steps have been taken, some situation will have been created that matches your initial picture of the outcome closely enough that you can call it “done”.

David Allen, prolific author and productivity consult

 

  1. What looks like multitasking is really switching back and forth between multiple tasks, which reduces productivity and increases mistakes by up to 50%.

Susan Cain, writer and lecturer

 

  1. Gardens are not made by singing ‘Oh, how beautiful!’ and sitting in the shade.

Rudyard Kipling, author

 

  1. Instead of worrying about what you cannot control, shift your energy to what you can create.

Roy T. Bennett, author

 

  1. Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.

Jim Ryun, athlete and politician

 

  1. Every champion was once a contender that didn’t give up.

Gabby Douglas, Olympic champion in gymnastics

 

  1. If you’re alive, you’re a creative person.

Elizabeth Gilbert, journalist

 

  1. The successful warrior is the average man, with laser-like focus.

Bruce Lee, actor and martial artist

 

  1. Let me tell you the secret that has led me to my goals: my strength lies solely in my tenacity.

Louis Pasteur, chemist and microbiologist

 

  1. The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.

Barack Obama, the 44th president of the United States

 

  1. Nothing will work unless you do.

Maya Angelou, author and activist

 

  1. If you’re going through hell, keep going.

Winston Churchill, politician and writer

 

  1. The simple act of paying positive attention to people has a great deal to do with productivity.

Tom Peters, business management expert

 

  1. The big secret in life is that there is no secret. Whatever your goal, you can get there if you’re willing to work.

Oprah Winfrey, talk show host and producer

 

As you can see, focus and effort are essential for productivity. We hope these quotes have given you the motivation to create something amazing.

 

This page was brought to you by Senstone. To learn more about productivity in the age of distractions, check out our homepage.

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Social Media vs. Productivity

Unpopular opinion: you can have a Facebook account and get things done. Productivity should not come at the cost of deleting social media.

 

Use social media and stay productive: is it even possible?

 

It seems these days, people are sharing strong sentiments about social media platforms – either love or cancel them. At least that’s what you see across the internet, which many believe is a true reflection of the real world – but wait a second. Is it?

 

First and foremost, a social media platform is a tool. Like any other instrument, people can use it to build or destroy – or both simultaneously. 

 

Secondly, social media can create community and bring joy. At the same time, they can also be detrimental to productivity and mental health. As you can see, it’s complicated.

 

Before participating on a social media platform, think about your intentions and define the purpose of your engagement. Does this platform serve your needs? Furthermore, can it support your goals without setting you back?

 

Social media can create connections

Social media can impede productivity

  • Keep in touch with family, friends, and co-workers
  • Shrink attention span and heighten ADHD
  • Connect with people from other environments
  • Distract you from your purpose with notifications
  • Create a front-row seat to the public opinion
  • Drive anxiety and depression
  • Entertain
  • Fuel procrastination from participating in real life

 

The platform designers build distractions into the user experience. A single notification can disrupt the deep focus needed for productivity. For example, when scrolling Facebook, each post distracts from the previous one. Moreover, automated content moves at warp speed, which forces us to multi-task to stay engaged. This gives the social media platform control of tired minds and drives behavior, therefore it’s not good for your brain (to say the least).

Have Your Cake and Eat it Too!

 

In 2016 Cal Newport, a computer science professor at Georgetown University, published a game-changing book, entitled “Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World.” Newport describes digital minimalism as a philosophy of technology used when users focus their online time on a small number of carefully selected and optimized activities that strongly support the things they value while happily missing out on everything else.

 

How can we apply digital minimalism to our lives to digitally detox – even a little, increase productivity, and enjoy social media?

 

  • Sacrifice the “anxious” digital entertainment. Social media uses gamification for you to “play” the platform by jumping between tags, headlines, cat photos, alerts, laughter, pain, fear, joy, anger, and invisibility.

 

  • Unsubscribe! Go through your list of subscriptions, because it’s ‘Marie Kondo’ time!  

 

  • Calendar your social media viewing and sending. Many websites and apps provide the option to schedule posts and updates.

 

  • Turn off Notifications (all the way or almost). Social media now lets audiences control notifications. In the app settings, select which type of notifications to allow and which type to trash. Then choose the times of day to receive notifications.  

 

  • Imagine unrelated clicks are paid.  Finally, our lifehack of the day: imagine you buy every idle click for $5, while the “free” clicks are reserved for your job. It is an excellent technique because, with it, you can see your priorities clear as day. Are you ready to pay $5 to watch a 10-seconds-long cat video? Do you want to like a funny GIF that bad?

 

To sum up, increasing productivity in the age of integrated work and personal life requires the intentional use of social media. With intention, feel the results of digitally detoxing when leaving behind social media anxiety.

 

More articles that might interest you:

6 Tips To Double Your Productivity With Remote Work

Break the Dopamine Cycle With Scripter