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Thomas Edison and His Notebooks

Thomas Edison’s notebooks are legendary for several reasons. For example, there are 3,500 of them and… But we’re getting ahead of ourselves.

 

The Man Who Changed the World



Thomas Alva Edison was one of the most prolific and influential inventors in history, credited with many groundbreaking inventions, including but not limited to:

  • incandescent light bulb

  • phonograph (audio recorder & player)

  • kinetoscope (motion picture camera)

  • alkaline battery for electric cars

  • fuel cell technology



Edison founded the Edison Electric Light Company (later General Electric) to commercialize his discoveries and establish a market for electric lighting. Throughout his career, he held over 1,000 patents.



In addition, Edison’s legacy includes the establishment of research laboratories, such as the famous Edison Laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey. He remains an iconic figure in the world of entrepreneurship – and one of the most talented people in history.

 

Thomas Edison Loved Taking Notes

 

Thomas Edison was known to be an avid note-taker, often carrying pocket notebooks (yes, multiple) to write down ideas. In the 1970s it took a team of historians a full year just to find all of his New Jersey notes, and they had to go “from building to building”.



The total volume of Thomas Edison’s notes?



3,500 notebooks, around 285 pages each.



5 million words. Thousands of sketches.



Thomas Edison’s notebooks were filled with a variety of content, including diagrams, calculations, lists, sketches, observations, and even (bad) attempts at poetry. He would often refer back to these notebooks when working on new projects or troubleshooting existing ones. (A productivity technique that Richard Branson swears by.)



thomas-edison-notebooks-page
A spread from one of the Edison’s notebooks



The collection is currently housed in the archives of the Thomas Edison National Historical Park in New Jersey.



What We Can Learn From Thomas Edison’s Notebooks



Although Thomas Edison was a messy writer, there was a method to his madness. Having this much material to work with, we can see pattern in the way he created and organized his notes, and we can learn from his mistakes.



#1. Write down everything.

Thomas Edison knew the importance of notes. He would write down everything, from to-do lists to ideas to observations about the world around him. And when words did not cut it, he would doodle and sketch.



#2. Always have a backup plan.

Backing up is easy when you have internet access, but Thomas Edison had to rely on copies. Sometimes he would write down an idea three or four times across different notebooks.



#3. Always have a recording device at hand.

Edison would have notebooks lying on benches and tables in the laboratory, grabbing the one that was closer. He would carry a dog-eared notebook in his pocket. These days we can use AI-powered wearables to take notes on the run, but Edison had to make do.



#4. Even the greats struggle to stay organized.

Edison would often lose track of his notes. He made several attempts at indexing his notebooks – to no avail. At the same time, he made his office staff reference the notebooks in lab journals. When that failed, he had researchers keep their own notes in the same fashion.



In conclusion, there is no doubt that Edison’s dedication to note-taking played a crucial role in his success. It helped him through patent struggles. It fueled his productivity. By meticulously recording thoughts and projects, he was able to organize his ideas, track his experiments, and make new discoveries. His notebooks serve as valuable resources for research – and a good example for entrepreneurs.

 

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Wearable Recording Device: Soon at Your Office

wearable-recording-device-technology

When you hear “wearable recording device”, you probably imagine a hidden camera straight out of a spy movie. This is about to change. More and more companies adopt wearable tech to record meetings and streamline note-taking.

 

Wearable Recorders & Voice Typing

 

A wearable recording device that uses AI to capture notes is the type of wearables that we are about to see enter the office.

 

Voice technology has evolved to the point where ignoring it would be inefficient. You do not use a 1930s typewriter when there is a perfectly good laptop right in front of you. This applies to manual typing and wearable voice recorders.

Why It’s a Good Idea

 

Incorporating a wearable into the office routine is a big step. It requires planning and adaptation. And yet, it is worth the hassle in the end. Why?

 

First of all, a wearable recording device works to help the user. Actively so. It manages files, corrects grammar and spelling, adds automatic keywords and titles, even creates reminders. This saves time and money.

 

Second, wearable recorders are built to keep you focused on the task. They do not distract you and never send notifications. Senstone Scripter is a good example of this design philosophy: it has only one button and no screen at all.

 

Third, wearables recorders boost productivity. You can instantly share recordings or transcripts with other employees. When there’s a business meeting, you can actually sit and listen – and emerge with every fine detail recorded.

 

Finally, wearables give you the advantage of correct posture and normal sight. That is something that inevitably suffers from the office setting, and wearable provide additional relief (but, sadly, cannot replace a good chair).

 

What to Expect From a Wearable Recorder

 

If you’re new to the world of wearable recording devices, you might not be aware of what counts as basic features. Apart from the obvious “it can record and transcribe audio”, your wearable recorder is expected to offer the following:

 

  • support for multiple languages

  • ability to work offline

  • correct and accurate transcription (the technology is there)

  • maximum recording length of at least 1 hour

  • automatic formatting

  • sharing & export options

  • encryption

Personal Tool – Or Fit For a Team?

 

You can use a wearable recording device alone. Voice assistants like Scripter do a great job at being your personal AI secretary. But they can also be used by a team.

 

For instance, outfitting managers with a wearable voice recorder allows them to keep real-time logs and pool those logs together. Tracking performance becomes an easy task.

 

Everything depends on the company and how it operates. Sometimes it makes sense to only use wearables for a certain unit. Sometimes quantity produces quality.

 

Do You Want to Learn More?

 

Visit our homepage and blog to familiarize yourself with wearable recorders. If you are thinking about integrating wearables into your work place, you can email us at team@senstone.io. We’ve been making productivity wearables for years, and this is something we can always help you with.

 

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5 Signs You Need a Phone Detox

technology-phone-detox-anxiety

Even if you’ve never heard the term ‘phone detox’ before, you can probably tell what it means. Taking a break from using your phone to reduce its influence on your health, both mental and physical, is becoming increasingly popular – for a good reason.

Odds are you experience one of the following symptoms. If you do, consider detoxing from your phone by dedicating certain time (hours or even days) to living offline. You can use a voice-to-text recorder like Scripter to finish your projects without breaking the phone detox, so you can stay productive without staring at the screen.

1. Digital Eyestrain.

Eyestrain is often described as a slight burn, sometimes the “gritty” feeling of sand that’s not really there, soreness, or itching under your eyelids. Prolonged eyestrain results in headaches and blurred vision.

How does my phone cause it? It’s a combination of factors. First of all, a screen makes us stop blinking as often as needed, which makes the natural film of moisture covering the eye dry out. Second, a phone screen is too close for too long; the lens of your eye stays contracted and doesn’t relax. Third, if your screen it too bright, it can strain your eyes even more.

How can I fix it? The only way to fix eyestrain is to rest your eyes. Take breaks. Use voice input to minimize your screen exposure.

2. Trouble Focusing.

Another reason to do phone detox is a lack of focus. If you find yourself watching 20 seconds of a YouTube video, then switching to another one, then another one, then another one, your attention span has been damaged by the internet.

How does my phone cause it? Our brain is evolved to adapt. If we get used to information switching really fast, it adapts to that. But there’s a price: we lose the ability to focus on a single constant stream of information, such as a lecture or a long movie. Our brain develops the knee jerk impulse to switch.

How can I fix it? Your brain developed a short attention span to deal with the internet. You can make it adapt back. Pick up tasks that require long periods of focus. It could be reading, a craft, learning a language, or even exercise. Make them a habit, and make sure you don’t get distracted.

3. Trouble Falling Asleep.

A healthy person falls asleep within 15 minutes. Many people have trouble with that, and it’s not insomnia proper: they only toss and turn for an hour or so until they finally drift off. They also find it hard to get up in the morning.

And yes, this can be another symptom of too much screen time.

How does my phone cause it? Blue light makes your brain think it’s daytime and halts melatonin production. Additionally, reading news or texting can agitate you, which makes it harder to fall asleep. Eyestrain doesn’t help matters either.

How can I fix it? You guessed it, phone detox before bed. Health experts say 2 hours is enough to recover from blue light. (Pro tip: do not keep your phone on the bedside table; it helps resist the temptation.)

4. Dopamine Addiction.

Every time we perform a successful action, our brain releases a tiny burst of a chemical called dopamine. It makes us feel good. We crave another dopamine release, and it helps us stay motivated.

Smartphones make it so our source of dopamine is always at hand.

How does my phone cause it? Gaming apps, likes and dislikes, texting, even pressing a button makes brain release dopamine. We get addicted, and we know another dopamine release is just a click away. Although the addiction is purely psychological, it still makes it very hard to put away the phone.

How can I fix it? Take breaks from your phone. Limit your time playing games. Avoid fast-paced attention grabbers like TikTok.

5. Anxiety Alleviated by Phone Detox.

We all know what anxiety feels like. We know the short-lived anxiety you feel before a job interview and understand it’s normal. But long periods of anxiety are bad for your health.

Unfortunately, anxiety is on the rise around the globe. Many experts attribute this to our internet habits.

How does my phone cause it? A phone makes us expect another notification, whether we realize it or not. We browse bad news all day, even if most of them are irrelevant to our lives. Social media lower our self-esteem by displaying unrealistic pictures of success.

How can I fix it? Chronic anxiety is a serious concern, so it’s best to consult a health professional. However, you can make things easier for yourself. Do not engage with the content that upsets you. Avoid the media that deliberately posts shocking or fear-mongering news. Focus on your well-being.

 

We are Senstone. For years, we’ve helping our customers stay focused. Our AI-powered productivity wearables are uniquely efficient and user-friendly. Check out our homepage at senstone.io to learn more.

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‘Scarily Good’: The Voice Technology Revolution

voice-technology-wearable-device-senstone

Voice technology got impressive when we weren’t looking. Seemingly out of nowhere, cutting-edge solutions pop up one by one, and they actually work.

 

This generates a lot of discussion, which inevitably lags behind the reality: people can’t not use something this good. While tech experts argue about the ramifications of AI, the internet has a field day exploiting AI-powered voice technology.

 

And you know what? I think everyone should try it.

 

voice-technology-wearable-senstone

 

1. Voice Typing & Transcription.

The voice transcription technology used to be hilariously bad. You had to speak in a refined TV accent, and even then you’d get gems like “cat atrophy” (catastrophe), “success exam” (6:06 AM), and “cake asked me to” (tracheostomy tube).

 

Today voice typing is at 99% accuracy. You can even buy wearables allowing you to voice type without a phone. These apps and devices support multiple languages. They ‘understand’ accents and compile your notes into neat, formatted text files. You can also browse the internet using nothing but your voice; and this used to be sci-fi.

 

Examples:

2. Voice Cloning.

One of the most controversial and flashy services enabled by the progress of voice technology is voice cloning. It’s exactly what is says on the tin: AI can copy any voice. A 30 seconds worth of audio is enough for it to pick up your speech patterns.

 

While many netizens immediately think about identity theft and scamming, imagine all the creative content that can be made using voice cloning. The audio books, the movies, the video games.

 

Voice cloning can potentially help disabled people express themselves more clearly, or even regain speech. It can assist paralysed patients, those with vocal cord issues, and other diseases.

 

Examples:

  • ElevenLabs: cutting edge voice cloning gone publicly available

3. Voice Recognition.

Voice recognition technology keeps making big steps ahead, all thanks to advancements in machine learning and NLP (natural language processing). Major tech companies like Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, and IBM made a lot of progress in improving their voice recognition systems. The field is tense with competition, and for good reasons.

 

Uses for voice recognition include gadgets adjusting to your emotions, personalizing smart homes, and boosting your security with additional voice checks.

 

Examples:

  • Deepgram: commercial voice recognition & speech-to-text API

  • Beey: online voice recognition service

4. Smart Assistants & Voice Technology.

Combine the best voice technology has to offer into one and get smart assistants. As they keep getting better, expect your Alexa to be able to mimic voices, read your mood, and book appointments for you.

 

The disadvantage of such assistants is that they need a constant online connection to access all of their functions.

 

Examples:

  • Siri: app, virtual assistant by Apple

  • Alexa: physical device, made by Amazon

  • Cortana: the Microsoft virtual assistant for Windows

While some people might feel uneasy about the world changing so rapidly, ultimately the voice technology revolution is a good thing. The new tools are helpful and easy to use, and you can access them from the comfort of your home.

 

If you want to know more about voice tech and the future of technology, read more of our posts here, sign up to our newsletter, and follow us on social media.

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How Do Wearables Connect to Your Smartphone?

Have you ever wondered how wearables connect to your smartphone? How do they “know” to send data to your phone specifically? What type of connection do they use? How does it work? Read on, and we’ll do our best to answer these questions.

 

Why Do Wearables Connect to Other Devices?

 

Before we get into how wearables connect to smartphones, let’s establish why they need to connect to your phone at all.

Unlike your laptop, most wearables are highly specialized. That means they were designed to perform only a certain amount of functions. For example, Senstone is a wearable voice-to-text recorder. Its functions are: 1) record audio on demand, 2) store the recordings, 3) make sure audio is transferred to the cloud storage and processed by artificial intelligence. As you can see, step 3 relegates the data to a more generalist and powerful machine.

 

This “division of labor” is what makes wearables so efficient. They connect to other devices and access their computing power. The ability to connect is a core feature, and wearables rely on it a lot.

  • Notifications are sent and received.
  • Commands allow you to control other devices.
  • Data is collected for storage and analysis. This is how you get your activity stats in real time.
  • More functions, such as AI spell checking, can be accessed by sending the data for processing to another computer.

In short, wearables really do need to connect to other devices. And your phone is perfect for the job!

Wearables & Wireless Connection(s)

 

We’ve come closer to answering the original question: how do wearables connect to smartphones? The reason why people ask this a lot is because they cannot see a visible proof of connection, i. e. wires.

 

Wireless technology shaped wearables as we know them. There would be no wireless headphones without a way for them to receive the music they are supposed to play.

With the many types of wearables we have today, there are several different technologies used to connect a gadget to your phone.

  • Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and Bluetooth Classic. These two standards are the most common ways for your wearable to connect to your phone. Devices supporting Bluetooth connect using ultra-high frequency radio waves. You need to enable Bluetooth on  both devices and pair them so that they automatically exchange data when nearby. The BLE standard is cheaper and better suited for low-power gadgets, and this is why most Bluetooth wearables run BLE.
  • Wi-Fi. Some wearables can connect to your smartphone via the regular Wi-Fi. This allows for a greater range and faster data transfer speeds. To connect your wearable to your smartphone via Wi-Fi, you usually need to connect both devices to the same Wi-Fi network and  then pair them.
  • Near Field Communication (NFC). NFC is a short-range technology that allows for contactless communication between two devices in very close proximity (4 cm or less). Some wearables have NFC capabilities, allowing you to pair them with your smartphone by simply holding the devices close together. Contactless payments is the usual reason for running NFC on a wearable.
  • ANT+. An ultra-low-power protocol. Unlike others on the list, ANT is meant for sports wearables.

Some wearables can use more than one protocol. The specific methods of connectivity will heavily depend on the make and model of wearable and smartphone, so you can always refer to the user manual for more information on how to connect your gadgets.


This post has been brought to you by Senstone. As a company, we have been actively contributing to wearable technology for years. You can visit our homepage – or read another article about cutting-edge inventions and trends. Stay cool!

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The Digital Divide & Why We Should Fight It

Our world is facing another challenge: the so-called digital divide. This term is used to describe the growing technological disparity between certain countries or social strata, the gap in technology access between the richer areas and those who didn’t luck out.

 

The divide can be caused by several factors:

  • Physical location. Lack of imported gadgets or parts, low economic development, remote and/or inaccessible regions, isolated economies, little to no infrastructure all contribute to the digital divide.
  • Low income. Many people cannot use new technology simply because they cannot afford it. 24% of adult people with household incomes below $30,000/year don’t own a smartphone. 40% of those with lower incomes don’t have home broadband services or don’t own a PC. Location influences income also, with certain regions being poorer and/or experiencing low purchasing power.
  • Low literacy. College graduates have a much better grasp on tech due to their education, and they usually own more gadgets.
  • Low motivation. Some people possess the necessary income and education to use the full potential of technology, but choose not to. Mostly this is due to the lack of motivation (“I don’t need it”) and age (“This is too different from what I’m used to”). Luckily, there are one-button gadgets like Senstone Scripter, but they are far and few.

All of the above can be countered with policies, reforms, and awareness campaigns. While such sweeping measures can seem too drastic, they are completely justified.



Why Closing the Digital Divide Is Worth the Effort

The digital divide concerns everyone, even those who don’t experience its immediate effects. Since the industry has become globalized, with supply chains spanning the entire planet, a physically distant event or phenomenon can influence the unsuspecting citizens around the globe.

Let’s consider a city that experiences a bad case of digital divide, such as the lack of internet access. It creates all sorts of problems for the state:

  • problems implementing digital solutions such as eID, remote education, billing, mobile banking
  • creating a real-life divide between those who can access technology and those who can’t
  • fewer citizens can become skilled workers
  • low income cycle: cannot afford new technology – cannot make money using it – cannot afford new technology

uninformed voters are easier to manipulate into supporting backwards and/or harmful policies

 

 

Reversing the trend will bring a lot of benefits to the tech industry of the city and, by extension, the rest of the world.

  • more clients
  • more demand
  • more skilled workers
  • more opportunities


The community will directly profit from the policies aiming to close the digital divide, and the effects are going to last for generations.

  • better education
  • higher income
  • job opportunities
  • easier communication

Everybody wins.

 

How to Bridge the Digital Divide?

The digital divide is a relatively recent trend, and governments and companies are only just starting to catch up with reality.

In the US, policies are being implemented to ensure access to the broadband internet for all Americans. The issues are mostly local, with rural and tribal areas overrepresented in the statistics, and the percent of Americans without broadband access ranges between 6 and 12% depending on the study.

 

The US solution can be boiled down to a few bullet points:

  • federal programs that help cover the cost of communication services
  • broadband service discounts
  • promoting mobile and satellite internet
  • avoid unnecessary regulation of ISPs
  • e-learning vouchers for students

Other countries, like India, where the digital divide problem is much more severe (half the Indians don’t have access to broadband), have had moderate success when dealing with it. A lesson we can learn from them is simple: lack of systemic approach undermines all effort.

To conclude, it’s important to remember that the digital divide can be reversed, but fighting it has to become the business of policymakers. As regular netizens, we can do our best to draw attention to the problem and support the candidates who focus on communities and infrastructure.

 

This article has been brought to you by Senstone Inc. We are dedicated to making advanced technology accessible to everyone regardless of age and technical know-how. Visit our homepage at senstone.io to learn more.

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HoloLens in the U.S. Army: Failed?

Although Microsoft has successfully adapted its HoloLens for the military, it seems something has gone wrong in the recent months. When Joe Biden signed the $1.75 trillion government funding bill, it became clear that the Army’s request for another batch of the Microsoft headsets had been denied.

 

Why? Has the whole idea been scrapped? What’s going on?

 

Augmented Reality Warfare

 

HoloLens and the military are not an unusual pairing by any means, nor is it unexpected. Microsoft Inc. and the U.S. army have been making deals since 2018 – this much has been made public. The corporation reworked its “civilian” HoloLens headset into Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) suited for the battlefield. It brought Microsoft a contract that could be worth the whopping $21.8 billion.

 

According to the news, IVAS’ primary purpose is displaying data such as low-light vision, mission data, location map, and other parameters. The goal is to increase situational awareness of a soldier, in transit or dismounted. Of course, a wearable like that is also going to be very useful for training and simulation…

 

Provided it makes the cut.

 

In October 2022, a leaked report caused quite a stir describing multiple shortcomings of the updated HoloLens as field tested by thousands of U.S. soldiers over the course of (at least) two years. According to the report, testers experienced nausea and headaches in addition to eye strain, and the symptoms persisted for hours. The glowing display was visible enough from outside that it could have “gotten us killed” in real life combat.

 

And so the Congress has ostensibly reacted to these findings. When the Army requested $400 million to buy 6,900 modified HoloLens headsets from Microsoft in 2023, the answer was “no”.

 

The Future of IVAS

 

Despite the difficulties and “low acceptance”, the HoloLens military tests are going to continue. Instead of the above-mentioned $400 million, the Congress approved $40 million to spend on the 1.2 version of the headset. And shortly before that, $125 million were allocated to spend on fixing the old model’s weak spots.

 

The new HoloLens for the Army promises an updated form factor (less of a helmet and more of a goggles), presumably to make the device less conspicuous. A range of improvements to the display aim to remove the negative symptoms experienced by the wearer. There is even talk about integrating IVAS to the Bradley platform, making the soldier retain their connection to the vehicle upon dismount and see what the Bradley sensors see when inside the car.

 

One thing is clear: the military needs wearable AR goggles. All the data gathered by sensors has to be delivered to the unit on site as efficiently as possible. The old-timey radios no longer suffice. We’re looking at yet another cutting edge technology entering the military.


This article has been brought to you by Senstone Inc. If you want to learn about wearable technology and its impact, visit our homepage or follow us on social media. Your productivity is our mission.

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Wearable Art Is Not What You Think

 

What Sophie de Oliveira Barata makes is wearable art, and she illustrates her point using pictures of her one-of-a-kind prosthetic limbs. Most of them are highly impractical: they are meant to be flaunted, shown off, photographed. Her creations bridge the gap between wearable gadgets and artwear.

 

She is not the only one who merges art with wearable technology.

 

The Kind of Art to Wear

 

Wearable art used to mean unique, imaginative clothing items. Not fashion but art coincidentally shaped like something to wear. While the basic definition still holds, the “clothing” part has been evolving, and technology is the usual suspect.

 

One of the first innovations to make it into the world of wearable art was the tiny, inconspicuous LED. It enabled fashion designers to incorporate light into their projects. Glowing dresses and body-turned-installation, predictably, followed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image credit: Maria Castellanos

 

But here’s a thing about art: it shrugs off function as well as mass production.

 

Mundane wearable devices like a fitness watch did not conquer the artwear scene. Wearable art is never mass produced. A limited edition wristband would not qualify as art as long as its primary functions remain telling time and counting steps instead of expressing an artistic concept. The line between art and ornament becomes pretty clear when approached (and surprisingly few do approach it).

 

The core hardware involved in wearables, however, has been adopted by the wearable art creators as soon as it entered the market.

 

The Kind of Wearables to Art Up

 

More and more, wearable technology becomes the vehicle for wearable art. These days it is responsible for all the moving, glowing, and interactive parts.

 

Cutting-edge microchips enabled Sophie de Oliveira Barata to make her prosthetic art reality. They also inspired the attendants of the International Conference on Art and Technology in the Spanish Bilbao.

 

Behnaz Farahi, an Iranian-born American architect and designer, used the occasion to present her wearable art in the form of “emotive fabric”. It changes shape in response to different stimuli and, being connected to the wearer through multiple sensors, can react to their emotions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image credit: Behnaz Farahi

 

Another spectacular example of wearable art is the project by Maria Castellanos and Alberto Valverde. Dubbed as “The Environment Dress”, it’s a peculiar-looking fashion statement that measures the level of intensity and aggression surrounding its wearer throughout the day. Temperature, noise, radiation, and even CO2 levels are fed into the sensors, making the dress emit light.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image credit: Maria Castellanos

 

 

And if all of the above sounds interesting to you, annual events like the Technarte Conference (Spain), World of Wearable Art (New Zealand), or The Wearable Art Show (Canada) offer a real spread of wearable art – as well as art in technology, including 3D printed pieces.

 

This article has been brought to you by Senstone. We make stylish and functional wearables for busy people. Check out the homepage to learn more about our wearable speech-to-text recorder. Follow us for more news about the world of wearables.

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Wearables in Healthcare: Becoming the New Normal

As technology improves, wearables in healthcare are becoming more and more popular. This is hardly surprising. From monitoring vitals around the clock to making the documentation process easier on practitioners, wearable technology affords some unique benefits.

 

Healthcare in Real Time

 

One of the main contributions wearables are currently making to healthcare is health monitoring. You no longer have to confine a person to the bed and hook them up to clunky machinery to get the necessary data.

 

  • heart rate
  • heart rhythm
  • blood oxygen saturation
  • breathing
  • sleep patterns
  • blood pressure
  • movement (walking, running, fall)

All these (and more) can be measured using a smart watch. Days, weeks, and months of statistical data help correctly assess the wearer’s health. And you don’t need to lend out expensive apparatus; watches are available at any tech store.

 

A frequently asked question about health wearables is whether they are accurate enough to be used for treating and diagnosing diseases. These doubts are still here because we remember all too well the first generations of wearable tech.

 

Luckily, things have gotten much, much better during the decade. Now doctors can rely on wearables for recording vitals, and there are even ECG watches approved by the FDA.

 

Wearables For the Doctor

 

A less obvious application of wearables in healthcare would be catering to the medical practitioners themselves.

 

Since the paperwork has been abandoned in lieu of electronic records (EHR), there is a lot of typing going on at the hospitals. Some information needs to be memorised before it can be recorded. For the doctors who use regular notebooks, their notes have to be transferred into the computer. According to a study, American doctors waste two-thirds of their time filling out forms.

 

Wearable recorders converting speech to text on the fly have emerged as the high-tech solution to the problem. 

 

Devices like Senstone Scripter allow physicians to record a patient’s data once – and transfer it between devices instantly while the AI makes sure there will be no spelling mistakes.

 

Although some smartphone apps can be used to a similar effect, wearables have the advantage of being hands-free

 

Their other strong point is the lack of intrusive notifications. You are free to concentrate on one task at a time and enter a state of deep focus. 

 

A wearable recorder has long battery life, too; a doctor doesn’t have to juggle texting, calls, and recording trying to make the phone last longer.



In conclusion, wearables and healthcare seem to have found each other. The former have improved to the point where a store-bought product can be used to reliably monitor health conditions. The latter has been successfully implementing wearable technology for years. Cardiology is the field most well-known for its application of wearables, but we can see other fields (like neurology) catching up to it already.

 

Stay productive!

 

This article has been brought to you by Senstone, a company working to make note-taking a seamless and effortless experience – anywhere, anytime. If you want to learn more, visit our home page or follow us on social media.

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How to Write a Biography (Using a Voice Recorder)

Biographies and autobiographies remain popular, and ‘how to write a biography’ is a surprisingly common search – along with people asking how to outline a book. Asking questions is important, especially when you’ve only just dipped your toes into the whole writing business.

 

While the ‘traditional’ approaches to writing are still going strong, these days we have some good alternatives which might suit you more than pen and paper (or hands and keyboard).

 

One of the alternative writing methods, in our opinion, is especially convenient for biography creators; using a voice recorder to capture and automatically transcribe your work.

 

Here is why we think you should definitely give it a shot.

 

It’s a Kind of Magic

 

Even if you’re wondering how to write a biography and not, say, an epic poem, you still have a lot in common with the ancients. The first biographies were composed in the form of tales to be recited; there was no way to record them. Even The Iliad in all its 15,600 lines glory spent at least five centuries as folk songs. Performers added and subtracted from it as they saw fit.

 

What we’re hinting at is the long-forgotten principle ready to make a return: it’s okay to create text without writing down a single word.

 

And unlike the Ancient Greek rhapsodes, you don’t have to memorise your book by heart.

 

Voice technology is one of the greatest opportunities for authors, especially if the idea is to publish a biography, and modern recorders are very much like a personal secretary. Scripter offers accuracy as high as 99% for English; a far cry from what we had to deal with just a decade ago.

 

The features we’re looking at:

  • automatic transcription, also known as speech-to-text
  • flexibility, i.e. the recording device has to be portable
  • automatic syntax (commas, paragraphs)
  • safe storage
  • synchronisation across devices

 

You are going to need:

  • a recording device (or a specialised app)
  • …and that’s it

 

Biographical Writing & Voice Tech: Made for Each Other

 

So how to write a biography in a way that would exploit all of the advantages offered by voice technology?

 

  1. If you’ve done your research, you don’t need to take peeks at the outline. There can be no surprises. The eagles are not going to swoop in and pick up your character from the peak of Mount Doom. You’re safe from plot holes. This means you can write (speak) in little chunks, bits and pieces. Start anywhere, compile later.

 

  1. Biographies and flowery prose live in different realms. When writing a biography, you can write more or less as you speak. Voice technology is perfect for capturing the natural flow of thought.

 

  1. You can write anywhere. The best ideas often have the worst timing possible. Take a walk – and write. Keep driving – and write. Lie in bed – and write. Pacing often helps us think – and of course voice-to-text lets you write while pacing.

 

To sum up, speaking to the imaginary reader is better than staring at the cursor. The illusion of communication gets your mind to speed up!

 

For writers, one of the best options on the market is Senstone Scripter (app and/or recording device). It’s tailored to assist content creators, doesn’t rely on the internet connection, and allows you to avoid the common distractions.

 

If you’d like to know more about Senstone Scripter and voice technology, visit our home page. Voice technology for lightning fast note taking is what we’re good at!

 

To browse our website for more articles like this one, check out our blog.

 

Good look with your writing!